Monthly Archives: November 2017

#219 – Cody Wheat – Shots of History



The Life of Dad After Show - Episode 219 - Cody Wheat - Shots of History

Art Eddy brings on Cody Wheat to talk about what type of alcohol and drinks that you should bring to holiday parties this year.

Cody discusses his podcast called Shots of History where he shares his interviews and stories about the people and events that shape what we drink. As he says about his podcast, it is, "The history of alcohol, one shot at a time."

For more on Cody go to ShotsofHistory.com.


#218 – Kori Reed & Mike Becker



The Life of Dad After Show - Episode 218 - Kori Reed & Mike Becker

Art Eddy brings on Kori Reed and Mike Becker to talk about their book, ZagZig Parenting. In their book they invite you to explore a married couple’s contemporary perspective on parenting through comical vignettes that share their differences, struggles, mistakes, and failures (with raw feedback from the kids).

Written by Kori, a career-driven mom, with commentary from Mike, an over-twenty-year primary caregiver to their four children, this book shows work-life integration from a different lens and creates a safe, nonjudgmental, positive environment to reimagine traditional family frameworks, including dad as the dude who does the dishes and other duties while mom makes the moola.

These genuine, transparent, and vulnerable stories about life as a nontraditional family aim to paint a picture of everyday chaos, provide comic relief, and permit parents to thrive as they embrace their perceived shortcomings in the context of work-family flow. Parenting issues don’t discriminate. All parents experience similar challenges, regardless of their family dynamics.

For more go to ZagZigParenting.com.


#217 – Jim Baumann – Common Sense for Our Common Good



The Life of Dad After Show - Episode 217 - Jim Baumann - Common Sense for Our Common Good

Art Eddy and Ryan Hamilton bring on Jim Baumann to talk about his new book, Common Sense for Our Common Good: A Parent Guide To Good Schools.

The purpose of Common Sense for Our Common Good: A Parent Guide To Good Schools is to make critical information about good schools available to you so you know what makes your child’s school a good one and how you can assist your child’s school to become better. It puts a premium on common sense linked to research and effective practices by identifying basic components that all good schools should have.

Common Sense for Our Common Good also suggests ways by which you, in your parental role as school parent partner, children’s advocate and informed educational consumer, can be effective in supporting and promoting a good school.

For more information on Jim Baumann and his book go to cscg.education.


#216 – James Flawith – Lil Worker Safety Gear



The Life of Dad After Show - Episode 216 - James Flawith - Lil Worker Safety Gear

Art Eddy brings on James Flawith, who is an arborist and the founder of Lil Worker Safety Gear. He and his wife have as he says three ruckus-making young lads. Art talks with James about fatherhood, creating the Lil Worker Safety clothing and being on the Canadian show, Dragons Den, to pitch his business.

While James is at work the law requires that he wears high visibility, high contrast clothing to keep him safe from hazards. When he gets home from work his sons love to tackle him to the ground, strip off his safety gear and parade around the house in it. As cute as it is, wearing big, baggy adult safety gear actually makes my little men less safe. Laughing and running quickly turns into crying and sobbing when long shirts trip little legs and small boys go flying.

As a responsible parent, safe worker and fun-loving Dad, he ventured out to find my boys some high visibility safety shirts of their own. After looking doggedly in retail stores and searching online, though, he couldn’t find any children’s safety gear that replicated what he would wear on the job site.

Determined not to let my boys down, he set out to make some high visibility kids’ clothing of his own. Real high visibility kids’ clothing. And the rest is history.

For more info, go to LilWorkerSafety.ca.